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Basic Needs Grants

Basic needs such as food, shelter, clothing, and access to health care is the first step to identifying the complex, long-term issues families with young children face, that will eventually require collaborative solutions.
 
While we work toward long-term outcomes through our CORE Collaborative Approach, continued support of families with young children for basic needs such as food, healthcare, housing, clothing, and transportation is a necessity. Though the majority of our community investments have been made into the CORE Collaboratives, we continue to make some program-level investments in basic needs, working with these partners to integrate into the collaborative model over time. We anticipate that basic needs programs will be a valuable entry point for families to connect with Collaboratives that can provide holistic services for both the children and the adults in their lives.
 
Thirty percent of the CORE Fund was allocated to Basic Needs grants. These grants were awarded to provide basic need services and/or access to services for young children (prenatal to age eight) and their families with low income. These Basic Needs grants are 1-year investments and began in January 2018.

All funding decisions were made by volunteers who also helped refine our investment focus. Funding determinations were based on the priority of needs, a program's effectiveness, and its ability to show measurable results. Grants were available to public and nonprofit organizations that met the minimum standards for eligibility and could submit all required eligibility documentation. Program grants were not awarded for capital projects.

 

CONTACT
Any questions related to our Basic Need Grants investments or future grant opportunities should be directed to Lark Kesterke, Director of Impact and Investments, at lark.kesterke@uwsc.org or 425.374.5506.

 

FUNDED BASIC NEEDS PROGRAMS

 
Bridge to Basics Outreach Program
Agency: WithinReach
Focus: Food
 
WithinReach’s Bridge to Basics program helps low-income families maximize existing supports and resources in their community to combat childhood hunger. Finding the right help is hard, and WithinReach makes it easy. They are stationed in the community to help families with young children navigate complex systems, so that they can focus on being parents. They help hungry families find and access healthy food and find programs like playgroups or parenting support classes to help families learn and grow together. Their highly trained, multilingual Bridge to Basics staff also follow up with families to make sure they get the resources they need.
 
 
Emergency Family Shelter
Agency: Housing Hope
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
Housing Hope’s Emergency Family Shelter Program brings homeless families with children off the streets into temporary shelter, and then provides connections to service-enriched permanent housing designed to address barriers standing in the way of the family’s success. This program begins with safe, stable, free housing and a comprehensive package of wraparound services to stabilize families in crisis. A professional Family Support Coach helps parents establish goals and plans for the future and connects children and youth to specialized child development services. The goal of this program is to stabilize families and move them to permanent housing within 90 days.
 
 
The Family Shelter
Agency: Interfaith Association of Western Washington
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
The Family Shelter is an emergency shelter that provides safety and basic needs, including all meals and focused assistance, to connect homeless families with permanent housing. The Family Shelter is one of two shelters in Snohomish County that allow one- and two-parent families with teenage sons or fathers remain with the family in their own, shared space. They only work with families with children or a pregnant mother. The average length of stay in the shelter was 83 days in the last year.
 
 
Healthy Kids, Healthy Families
Agency: Housing Hope
Focus: Health
 
The Healthy Kids, Healthy Families Program provides health services to homeless and low-income children and parents in Snohomish County. This program includes both short-term interventions for health crises and educational programming to support long-term healthy habits. This program includes: 1) Tomorrow's Hope Child Development Center’s “Kid’s Clinic" nutrition and education programs, 2) in-home intensive services for children with developmental delays and physical disabilities, and 3.) College of Hope's adult life skills courses on health & wellness.
 
 
Homeless Teen and Young Parent Program
Agency: Housing Hope
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
Housing Hope’s Homeless Teen and Young Parent Program is the only housing and service program for pregnant or parenting, homeless youth ages 16-24 in Snohomish County. The goal of this program is to stabilize families in crisis and empower young parents to escape poverty through stable housing and wraparound services. Parents are supported to complete their education and gain skills related to housing stability and self-sufficiency. Children are supported to heal from the trauma of homelessness and poverty and achieve developmental targets.
 
 
HOPE (Helping Our Young People Excel) Backpack Program
Agency: Stanwood Camano Food Bank
Focus: Food
 
The HOPE (Helping Our Young People Excel) Backpack Program of the Stanwood Camano Food Bank is the only weekend and summer feeding program for children in need in our communities. This grant will support the staff, supplies, and food that are necessary to feed their children. Their goal is to provide backpacks full of food, on a weekly basis, for at least 200 low-income children, with specific outreach to female heads-of-household with young children ages 0-8.
 
 
Housing Stability for Life
Agency: Housing Hope
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
Housing Stability for Life is a comprehensive housing and service platform that empowers homeless and low-income parents to escape poverty. Through safe, affordable housing and strengths-based supportive services, parents build skills related to advanced education and employment, and children are supported to achieve on-target development and school success.
 
 
Kindering Bothell - Families in Transition
Agency: Kindering Center
Focus: Health
 
Kindering's Families In Transition services will provide early developmental screenings; early intervention services, as-needed, including access to a Family Resource Coordinator who will coordinate services directly with the family; and Promoting First Relationships, which builds caregiver attachment through a 10-session training for those experiencing homelessness with a young child.
 
 
Little Sprouts Market - Preschool Food Program
Agency: Volunteers of America Western Washington
Focus: Food
 
Volunteers of America's Little Sprouts Market is an innovative pilot program that will bring healthy food directly to very low-income families with preschool-aged children, in a child-centric environment. This program leverages and builds upon the existing parent and child bond with, and participation in, preschool, while increasing access to healthy food by removing barriers such as transportation. Families get healthy food within a trusted environment (their preschool) in an uplifting and engaging format that builds community.
 
 
Northshore Healthy Starts
Agency: Northshore Youth & Family Services
Focus: Health
 
Healthy Start home visitors provide home-based services to support young, first-time parents who are 24-years-old or younger to promote the health of their young children. The purpose of the Healthy Start Northshore program is to prevent child abuse and neglect, promote optimal child development leading to school readiness, and facilitate the progress of young families toward stability and self-sufficiency.
 
 
Packs For Kids - Washington
Agency: Packs For Kids - Washington
Focus: Food
 
During the school year, The Packs For Kids Program provides a weekend food supplement for children and families living in food insecure households throughout the Mukilteo School District. Children receive a backpack filled with non-perishable food items on Friday to support their families through the weekend. They are currently working with the following schools: Horizon Elementary, Fairmount Elementary, Mukilteo Elementary, Explorer Middle, Olympic View Middle, and Mariner High. These children and their families would not have food to eat if it were not for the Packs program.
 
 
Proposal Name: Snohomish County Distribution Center
Agency: Volunteers of America Western Washington
Focus: Food
 
Volunteers of America Western Washington's Snohomish County Distribution Center is the critical backbone for hunger prevention in Snohomish County. This program addresses a countywide need for emergency food by distributing bulk food to partners who strategically address the problem of hunger in the community through direct client services. Last year, Volunteers of America Western Washington's Snohomish County Distribution Center received and distributed over 2.5 million pounds of food to both food banks and congregate meal programs. Without this warehouse capacity and operation, $3.8M worth of food distribution of emergency food would simply not happen in Snohomish County.
 
 
Removing Barriers to Employment and Economic Success
Agency: Village Community Services
Focus: Health
 
The purpose of the program is to provide basic needs assistance to low- to extremely low-income families with young children age 0 to 8 so they are physically and psychologically able to achieve their educational and employment goals. The program targets rural areas of north Snohomish County. Village Community Services will work in collaboration with the funded CORE Collaboratives and/or Family Resource Centers to help families address sanitation, shelter, nutrition, transportation, and other basic needs, that when unmet, are barriers to their long-term economic success.
 
 
Supportive Housing
Agency: Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
The Supportive Housing program provides housing subsidies, case management, and supportive services to families who have experienced domestic violence. Program staff work with participant families to develop an individualized self-sufficiency plan and then to work toward goals in that plan in the areas of education, employment, life skills, and financial independence—all leading to housing stability. Program staff work with children to help them overcome the effects of experiencing domestic violence in their homes. They work with parents on understanding the impact of domestic violence on their children, developing healthy parenting practices, and breaking the cycle of abuse.
 
 
Village Impact Project
Agency: Hand in Hand
Focus: Food
 
Village Impact Project addresses the needs of low-income families living in the Casino Road neighborhood who struggle with food insecurity, yet don’t know how to access food banks and meal programs. They educate families on local food programs and also address gaps in services, for example, ensuring that kids who depend on the free school breakfast and lunch as their only reliable source of meals have food when school is not in session, as well as providing families with food during the 7 to 14 day gap between being able to access food banks and other feeding programs.
 
 
YWCA Children's Services
Agency: YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
The YWCA Children’s Program works with homeless, low-income children under the age of eight and their families who are 185% of the Federal Poverty Level. The program provides services to support children's resilience and whole family self-sufficiency with the ultimate goal of breaking generational cycles of poverty and homelessness. Children’s opportunity for success is much more likely when the needs of both adults and children are holistically addressed.
 
 
YWCA Shelter and Housing Services
Agency: YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish
Focus: Housing/Shelter
 
The YWCA’s Shelter and Housing Services Program supports homeless, low-income mothers with young children; 95% will have incomes at or below 185% of the Federal Poverty Level. The goal is to break the intergenerational cycles of poverty and homelessness by obtaining self-sufficiency, increasing economic stability, and ultimately achieving permanent, safe, affordable housing. As families transition from homelessness to permanent affordable housing, they increase their security and safety, build practical skills, and are able to look critically at their family goals. The YWCA uses a multigenerational approach to alleviating homelessness and poverty through service integration focused on addressing whole family needs.