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Poverty Resource Page

2-Gen

United Way of Snohomish County: The Aspen Institute Whole FamilyThe Two-Generation Approach

The Aspen Institute’s policy program and national hub for collaborations, Ascend, is a valuable resource for understanding, implementing and evaluating the 2-Generation Approach. Visit The Aspen Institute's site.
 

United Way of Snohomish County: Building Adult Capabilities to Improve Child OutcomesBuilding Adult Capabilities to Improve Child Outcomes: A Theory of Change

This short video from the Frontiers of Innovation, elaborates on the importance of building the capabilities of caregivers to foster the learning, health and behavior of their children. Watch the video.

United Way of Snohomish County: Building Adult Capabilities2Gen Tools to Help Children & Families Thrive

From the Department of Education, here is a resource for programs serving children and families. Pages 5 & 6 contain a 2-Gen Checklist. Download the PDF.

Collaboration

United Way of Snohomish County: Pillars of Collective ImpactCollective Impact: Finding Ways to Work Better Together

Download the Opening Session slide deck that Aimee White presented at the Working Better Together Summit on September 15, 2015.

 

United Way of Snohomish County: Pillars of Collective ImpactCollective Impact: Common Agenda

Download the Common Agenda slide deck that Aimee White presented at the Working Better Together Summit on September 15, 2015.

United Way of Snohomish County: Shared MeasurementCollective Impact: Shared Measurement

Download the Shared Measurement slide deck that Jess Jorstad and Megan Farwell presented at the Working Better Together Summit on September 15, 2015.

Three Steps for Advancing Equity through Collective Impact

From disaggregating data to embedding equity into your backbone structure, Juan Sebastian Arias (Living Cities) and Sheri Brady (Aspen Forum for Community Solutions) highlight key practices you can do to advance equity within your collective impact work. Read the blog.

United Way of Snohomish County: Equity Matters in Collective ImpactEquity Matters in Collective Impact

In this powerful keynote address from the 2015 Collective Impact Convening, Angela Glover Blackwell (PolicyLink) shares how imperative it is that collective impact initiatives strive to help all community members reach their full potential. Read the blog.

United Way of Snohomish County: How to Partner for ImpactHow to Partner for Impact: The Nuts and Bolts of Aligning Collective Impact Efforts

How do we get started aligning collective impact efforts? Karen Pittman (The Forum for Youth Investment) shares strategies on how to engage and align with other collective impact initiatives in your community. Read the blog.

United Way of Snohomish County: Channeling ChangeChanneling Change: Making Collective Impact Work

An in-depth look at how organizations of all types, acting in diverse settings, are implementing a collective impact approach to solve large-scale social problems. Read the publication from this Stanford Social Innovation Review.

United Way of Snohomish County: Putting Community in Collective ImpactPutting Community in Collective Impact

Five characteristics of civic culture that collective impact efforts must address. Read the publication from this Stanford Social Innovation Review.

United Way of Snohomish County: Tamarak Logo

Collective Impact 3.0

Collective Impact is ever changing and evolving. Tamarack Institutues, Mark Cabaj, and Liz Weaver discuss the next version of this workCollective Impact 3.0. Read the publication.

United Way of Snohomish County: Equity Imperative in Collective ImpactBringing Soul to the Work of Collective Impact

In the second post in a three-part series in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Michael McAfee, vice president for programs and co-director of the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink, shares what he’s learned about how to advance equity within collective impact work. Read an excerpt below or the full post on SSIR.org.


 

Data & Research


Making Ends Meet Report


The Making Ends Meet report represents an attempt by United Way to better understand both the populations disproportionately impacted by poverty and the critical services helping to keep them afloat. Making Ends Meet is neither a comprehensive overview of poverty in Snohomish County nor a definitive statement on United Way’s funding or impact priorities. Instead, we offer this report as a part of the growing conversation about hardship in our community, and we look forward to learning more about the challenges in and solutions to breaking the cycle of poverty in Snohomish County. Download the report.

Poverty Simulation: What would it be like to live in poverty for one month?

There is no one cause, and no one face, of poverty and homelessness.

If you missed out on attending the poverty simulation in April, read more about the event:

City Data Briefs

Snohomish County is a strong and diverse community. However, many families in our community experience poverty and have complex needs.

The data briefs linked below present a snapshot of county-wide data, as well as data from each city within the county. As you will see, educational attainment, employment rates, health insurance coverage, and child school readiness are all impacted by poverty.

Download City Data Briefs (Alphabetical by City Name)

Print individual briefs by clicking on the printer icon in the top right corner of the PDF preview and entering the page number for your city in the “Pages to Print” box. 

A Quick Look at Poverty in Snohomish County

One in 10 county residents live in poverty.

Children born into poverty typically have children of their own growing up in poverty.

Children born into poor households are three times more likely to drop out of high school.

Families headed by a single female parent are the most likely to experience poverty.

At a minimum wage of $11, one would have to work 70 hours a week to afford a one-bedroom apartment.

ALICE  is a United Way acronym for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed—those who work hard and earn above the Federal Poverty Level, but not enough to afford a basic household budget of housing, child care, food, transportation and health care. Read more about ALICEs.

United Way of Snohomish County: Pillars of Collective ImpactEducation Session: Poverty: Early Learning in Snohomish County PowerPoint

Download the slide deck from the Education session at the November Working Better Together summit.

United Way of Snohomish County: Healthy Early Childhood Action Plan 2015A Healthy Early Childhood Action Plan: Policies for a Lifetime of Well-Being 2015

Trust for America's Health created this report, which highlights more than 40 policy target areas that are key to achieving national goals of reducing toxic stress and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and improving the lives of millions of children. Read the report.

United Way of Snohomish County: Cost of Living MapWhat Families Need To Get By: EPI’s Family Budget Calculator

While poverty thresholds help to evaluate what it takes for families to live free of serious economic deprivation, the Economic Policy Institute’s Family Budget Calculator offers a broader measure of economic welfare. Use the calculator.

United Way of Snohomish County: Living Wage MapThe Living Wage Map

An ongoing public debate about the struggle of low-income families to stay afloat raises a key question: how great is the gap between the minimum wage and the amount of money needed to meet a minimum standard of living? The Living Wage Calculator, developed by Professor Amy Glasmeier of MIT, examines this question. Explore the map.

United Way of Snohomish County: Affordable Housing and HealthThe Impacts of Affordable Housing on Health: A Research Summary

Affordable housing alleviates crowding and makes more household resources available to pay for health care and healthy food. High-quality housing limits exposure to environmental toxins that impact health. Stable and affordable housing supports mental health by limiting stressors. Read the summary.

For more information on poverty resources, email info@uwsc.org or call 425.374.5500.
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